A Brooklyn gang leader’s lies land him back in a cell: the feds

A Brooklyn gang leader has written himself back into his cell after prosecutors say he lied affidavit to help convict a fellow gangbanger.

Folk Nation Gangster Disciples Tuesday’s arrest of ringleader Ronald Britton for making false statements is the latest chapter in a violent gang drama that has sparked tstealing a faded gold chain in 2020.

That theft led to a series of shootings, and last November there were four gang members found guilty on trial in federal court in Brooklyn for conspiracy to murder members of a rival gang and attempted murder in furtherance of racketeering.

Now one of them, Lorenzo Bailey, is trying to overturn his verdict. In April, Britton did a solid thing for him – he swore he would Judge William Kuntz he said some of the evidence presented in court that linked Bailey to the gang was not true.

Britton was locked up from 2009 to April 2021 on a federal robbery conviction, and prosecutors alleged he ran the Folk Nation Gangster Disciples from behind bars during that time.

He was under parole supervision when he wrote an affidavit supporting Bailey.

In an affidavit, Britton denied being a gang leader and claimed he had not been in a gang for 14 years. He said he didn’t communicate with Bailey, didn’t create the gang hierarchy list presented at Bailey’s trial and that the cell phone found in Britton’s 12-bed jail cell at Fort Dix was not actually his.

Oluwagbenga Agoro (top left), Quincy Battice (top right), Jean Fremont (bottom left) and Lorenzo Bailey (bottom right), four Folk Nation gang members convicted in federal court in Brooklyn in a series of shootings sparked by a gold heist.  chain.
Oluwagbenga Agoro (top left), Quincy Battice (top right), Jean Fremont (bottom left) and Lorenzo Bailey (bottom right), four Folk Nation gang members convicted in federal court in Brooklyn in a series of shootings sparked by a gold heist. chain.

“That cell phone was not mine, nor did I ever use it to make calls or send text messages,” he wrote.

But Britton’s claims were “blatant lies” and provable, prosecutors say.

A cooperating witness in Bailey’s trial said Britton ran the gang and “evidence on the smuggled prison phone clearly shows (Britton) was using the phone, including through email and Facebook accounts logged into the phone,” prosecutors wrote in a memo. to request Britton’s detention without bond.

Britton faces up to 40 years behind bars if convicted. His lawyer declined to comment Thursday.

Bailey and three accomplices were found guilty of leading a two-day shooting war on the streets of Brooklyn against the Crips crew after someone ripped off co-defendant Jean “Bigg Twirl” Fremont’s chain on November 7, 2020.

The theft was an affront to the Folk Nation’s pride. The chain was attached to a thick gold pendant with a diamond ring, and in the center was embossed SPMB in large letters – an acronym that stands for “Stay Paid Money Burners”, the name of the crew associated with the Folk Nation Gangster Disciples.

Bailey’s attorney, Roger Adler, said prosecutors never called Britton to testify, but did introduce the gang’s cell phone organizational chart into evidence.

“We never had an opportunity to cross-examine him … Apparently the government’s position was that when they offered his chart, he was telling the truth, when he denied preparing the map, he was lying,” Adler said.

“It seems to me that the government wants to have its cake and eat it and deny their defendants their right to confrontation. Only time will tell how this plays out when Mr. Britton has his day in court.”

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